World leaders pledge to eliminate deforestation by the year 2030

Leaders from across the globe have pledged to end deforestation by 2030. Reportedly, countries who have signed this pledge including Canada, the Democratic Republic of the Congo, China, Indonesia, the US, Russia, Brazil, and the UK which altogether cover around 85% of the world's forests.

Brazil, where the Amazon rainforest has been destroyed lately, was also among the signatories.

According to the pledge, almost 14 billion ($19.2 billion) in public and private contributions will be invested in this cause.

Experts cheered the initiative but emphasized that a former agreement in 2014 failed to control deforestation and that promises must be kept.

Chopping trees contributes to climate change as it drains forests that absorb immense amounts of earth warming CO2.

Boris Johnson, the UK Prime Minister who is hosting the global meeting in Glasgow, notified that there had been a total of 110 leaders who have made the milestone commitment which is more than ever before.

He further said that it is necessary to halt the shocking loss of forests and make humans nature's custodian rather than nature's conquerors.

The two-week summit in Glasgow is very crucial for bringing climate change under control. Governments of 28 countries pledged to remove deforestation from the worldwide trade of food and other agricultural products such as soy, palm oil, and cocoa.

These industries contribute to forest loss by cutting trees to create room for livestock or crops.

More than 30 of the world's largest financial institutions, including Aviva, Schroders, and Axa, have pledged to stop investing in deforestation-related businesses.

In addition, a 1.1 billion fund will be formed to conserve the Congo Basin's tropical rainforest, which is the world's second largest.

Prof. Simon Lewis, a climate and forests expert at University College London, said it is brilliant news to have a political obligation to halt deforestation from so many nations and numerous financing to carry forward on that path.

Source Credit - https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-59088498